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Williamson's Sapsucker

Sphyrapicus thyroideus ORDER: PICIFORMES FAMILY: PICIDAE

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

A handsome woodpecker of the western mountains, the Williamson's Sapsucker, like other sapsuckers, specializes in drilling sap wells in trees.

At a GlanceHelp

Measurements
Both Sexes
Length
8.3–9.8 in
21–25 cm
Weight
1.6–1.9 oz
44–55 g
Other Names
  • Pic de Williamson (French)
  • Chupasavia de Williamson, Carpintero garganta roja (Spanish)

Cool Facts

  • In most species of woodpecker the sexes differ in appearance only subtly, usually with the male having red somewhere the female doesn't. Williamson's Sapsucker is unusual in having the male and female looking drastically different. The two sexes look so unalike that they originally were described as different species.

Habitat


Forest

Food


Insects

Nesting

Nest Placement

Cavity

Behavior


Bark Forager

Conservation

status via IUCN

Least Concern

Williamson's Sapsucker populations appear to have experienced a small decline between 1966 and 2014, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey. Partners in Flight estimates a global breeding population of 300,000, with 100% spending part of the year in the U.S., and 53% wintering in Mexico. This is a U.S.-Canada Stewardship species, and is rated a 13 out of 20 on the Continental Concern Score. Williamson's Sapsucker is not on the 2014 State of the Birds Watch List.

Credits

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