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Baird's Sandpiper

Calidris bairdii ORDER: CHARADRIIFORMES FAMILY: SCOLOPACIDAE

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

The long-winged Baird's Sandpiper prefers drier areas to forage than most other similar sandpipers.

At a GlanceHelp

Measurements
Both Sexes
Length
5.5–7.1 in
14–18 cm
Wingspan
13.8–15 in
35–38 cm
Weight
1–2.2 oz
27–63 g
Other Names
  • Bécasseau de Baird, Maubéche de Baird (French)
  • Correlimos de Baird, Playerito de Baird (Spanish)

Cool Facts

  • The migration of the Baird's Sandpiper is long but rapid. After departing high-arctic breeding grounds and staging in southern Canada and the northern United States, most individuals travel 6,000 kilometers (3,700 miles) or more directly to northern South America, some going on as far as Tierra del Fuego. Many individuals complete the entire 15,000 kilometer (9,300 mile) journey in as few as 5 weeks.
  • The female Baird's Sandpiper lays a clutch of eggs that is up to 120% of her body mass in four days, shortly after arriving in the Arctic, with essentially no stored fat.

Habitat


Shore-line

Breeds in dry coastal and alpine tundra. Migrates and winters along mudflats, estuaries, grassy marshes, and dry grassy areas near lakes and ponds, rarely dry pastures and prairies away from water.

Food


Insects

Nesting

Nesting Facts
Condition at Hatching
Active and covered with down.
Nest Placement

Ground

Behavior


Probing

Conservation

status via IUCN

Least Concern

There is no evidence of significant population trends to Baird's Sandpiper. They are not threatened globally, and both breeding and wintering grounds appear secure. The North American population is estimated at 300,000 individuals. They are not on the 2014 State of the Birds Watch List.

Credits

  • Moskoff, William and Robert Montgomerie. 2002. Baird's Sandpiper (Calidris bairdii). In The Birds of North America Online, No. 661 (A. Poole, Ed.). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York.
  • North American Bird Conservation Initiative, U.S. Committee. 2014. State of the Birds 2014 Report. U.S. Department of Interior, Washington, DC.

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