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Nuttall's Woodpecker

Picoides nuttallii ORDER: PICIFORMES FAMILY: PICIDAE

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

A small woodpecker confined primarily to the oak woodlands of California.

At a GlanceHelp

Measurements
Both Sexes
Length
6.3–7.1 in
16–18 cm
Weight
1.1–1.6 oz
30–45 g
Other Names
  • Pic de Nuttall (French)
  • Carpintero de Nuttall, Carpintero californiano (Spanish)

Cool Facts

  • Although Nuttall's Woodpeckers are nearly confined to oak woodlands, they do not eat acorns.
  • The oldest recorded Nuttall's Woodpecker was a female and at least 8 years, 9 months old when she was recaptured and rereleased during banding operations in California.

Habitat


Open Woodland

Found primarily in oak woodlands and in riparian woods; rarely in conifers.For a discussion of distribution and habitat use, go here

Food


Insects

Insects and arthropods, some fruit.

Nesting

Nesting Facts
Clutch Size
3–6 eggs
Egg Description
White eggs
Condition at Hatching
Young hatch naked and helpless.
Nest Description

Nest in cavity in trees.

Nest Placement

Cavity

Behavior


Bark Forager

Forages by gleaning, probing, prying and tapping.

Conservation

status via IUCN

Least Concern

Nuttall's Woodpecker populations are stable and slightly increased between 1966 and 2014, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey. However, this species is of moderate conservation importance, primarily because of its limited range, low overall density, and its association with intact oak and riparian forests. Partners in Flight estimates a global breeding population of 600,000 with 99% living in the U.S., and 1% in Mexico. They are a U.S.-Canada Stewardship species, and rate a 13 out of 20 on the Continental Concern Score. They are not listed in the 2014 State of the Birds Report. As a primary cavity nester, this species provides nest sites for many other species in these forests. Nuttall's Woodpeckers are somewhat tolerant of human activity.

Credits

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