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Bendire's Thrasher

Toxostoma bendirei ORDER: PASSERIFORMES FAMILY: MIMIDAE

IUCN Conservation Status: Vulnerable

Bendire's Thrasher is a bird of the deserts of southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Unlike other southwestern thrashers, it leaves the northern portion of its breeding range in winter, and wanderers sometimes appear at unexpected locations.

At a GlanceHelp

Measurements
Both Sexes
Length
9.1–9.8 in
23–25 cm
Weight
2.1 oz
60 g
Other Names
  • Moqueur de Bendire (French)
  • Cuitlacoche Sonorense, Cuitlacoche Piquicorto (Spanish)

Cool Facts

  • Bendire's Thrasher often cocks its tail over its back when running.
  • The oldest recorded Bendire's Thrasher was a male and at least 9 years, 6 months, when it was caught and released in California.

Habitat


Deserts

Desert, especially areas of tall vegetation, cholla cactus, creosote bush and yucca, and in juniper woodland.

Food


Insects

Insects, spiders, seeds, and berries.

Nesting

Nesting Facts
Clutch Size
3–5 eggs
Egg Description
White or very pale blue-green with dark speckles.
Condition at Hatching
Helpless.
Nest Description

Open cup of sticks, lined with soft materials. Placed in shrubs, cacti, or trees.

Nest Placement

Shrub

Behavior


Ground Forager

Forages on ground, pokes and probes in plant litter, and digs in the soil with its bill.

Conservation

status via IUCN

Vulnerable

Bendire's Thrasher declined by over 4.5% per year between 1966 and 2014, resulting in a cumulative decline of 90% during that time, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey. Partners in Flight estimates a global breeding population of 70,000 with 81% spending some part of the year in the U.S., and 51% in Mexico. They rate a 16 out of 20 on the Continental Concern Score, and are a Tri-National Concern species, and a U.S.-Canada Stewardship species. They are on the 2014 State of the Birds Watch List, which lists bird species that are at risk of becoming threatened or endangered without conservation action. Bendire's Thrasher is listed as "Species of Special Concern" in California.

Credits

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