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Hooded Warbler

Setophaga citrina ORDER: PASSERIFORMES FAMILY: PARULIDAE

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

A striking small bird of eastern hardwood forests, the Hooded Warbler prefers forests with some shrub understory.

At a GlanceHelp

Measurements
Both Sexes
Length
5.1 in
13 cm
Weight
0.3–0.4 oz
9–12 g
Other Names
  • Paruline à capuchon (French)
  • Reinita encapuchada (Spanish)

Cool Facts

  • The Hooded Warbler is strongly territorial on its wintering grounds. Males and females use different habitats: males in mature forest, and females in scrubbier forest and seasonally flooded areas. If a male is removed, a female in adjacent scrub will not move into the male's territory.
  • The oldest recorded Hooded Warbler was a male, and at least 8 years, 1 month old when he was recaptured and rereleased during banding operations in Louisiana in 2004.

Habitat


Forest

Food


Insects

Nesting

Nest Placement

Shrub

Behavior


Foliage Gleaner

Conservation

status via IUCN

Least Concern

Hooded Warbler are common and populations increased between 1966 and 2015, according to the North of American Breeding Survey. Partners in Flight estimates a global breeding population of 4.6 million with 100% breeding in the U.S., and 34% migrating through and wintering in Mexico. This species rates a 10 out of 20 on the Continental Concern Score. It is a U.S.-Canada Stewardship species. Hooded Warbler is not on the 2016 State of North America's Birds' Watch List.

Credits

Range Map Help

Hooded Warbler Range Map
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bird image Blue-winged Warbler by Brian Sullivan

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