• Skip to Content
  • Skip to Main Navigation
  • Skip to Local Navigation
  • Skip to Search
  • Skip to Sitemap
  • Skip to Footer

Marsh Wren

Cistothorus palustris ORDER: PASSERIFORMES FAMILY: TROGLODYTIDAE

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

A common and noisy inhabitant of cattail marshes, the Marsh Wren sings all day and throughout the night.

At a GlanceHelp

Measurements
Both Sexes
Length
3.9–5.5 in
10–14 cm
Weight
0.3–0.5 oz
9–14 g
Other Names
  • Long-billed Marsh Wren
  • Troglodyte des Marais (French)
  • Chivirín pantanero, Saltapared Pantanero (Spanish)

Cool Facts

  • Eastern and western populations of the Marsh Wren show slight differences in appearance, but large differences in song. In general, western birds are paler and drabber, and sing less musical songs. The differences may mean that the two forms are separate species.

Habitat


Marsh

Nests in variety of marshes, especially with dense reeds.

Food


Insects

Insects and spiders.

Nesting

Nesting Facts
Clutch Size
3–10 eggs
Egg Description
Brown with dark spots.
Condition at Hatching
Helpless with only wisps of down.
Nest Description

Domed nest of grasses and sedges with entrance on side, lashed to vegetation.

Nest Placement

Shrub

Behavior


Ground Forager

Actively moves about on or near marsh floor, gleans insects from plants and just below water.

Conservation

status via IUCN

Least Concern

Marsh Wren populations increased between 1966 and 2014, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey. Partners in Flight estimates a global breeding population of 9 million, with 81% spending some part of the year in the U.S., 18% breeding in Canada, and 38% wintering in Mexico. The species rates a 7 out of 20 on the Continental Concern Score. Marsh Wren is not on the 2014 State of the Birds Watch List.

Credits

Range Map Help

Marsh Wren Range Map
View dynamic map of eBird sightings
×

Search

Or Browse Bird Guide by Family, Name or Shape
×
bird image Blue-winged Warbler by Brian Sullivan

The Cornell Lab will send you updates about birds, birding, and opportunities to help bird conservation. You can unsubscribe at any time. We will never sell or give your email address to others.