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Townsend's Warbler

Setophaga townsendi ORDER: PASSERIFORMES FAMILY: PARULIDAE

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

A bird of the Pacific Northwest, the Townsend's Warbler nests in coniferous forests from Alaska to Oregon. It winters in two distinct areas: in a narrow strip along the Pacific Coast, and in Mexico and Central America.

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Appearance

Warblers
Warblers
Typical Voice

Adult Description

  • Small songbird.
  • Chest and face yellow.
  • Stripes down sides of chest.
  • Two white wingbars.
  • Dark face patch.
  • Dark crown.
  • Black in throat.

Male Description

Crown and throat black. Face yellow. Black cheek patch with yellow crescent under eye. Black streaks extend from throat down sides. Chest and sides yellow. Belly and undertail white. Back olive green with black streaks or spots. Two white wingbars.

Female Description

Crown olive-green with thin black streaks. Cheek patch olive. Cheek, throat, chest, and sides yellow. Some black markings in throat. Back olive with thin black streaks. Belly and undertail white. Two white wingbars.

Immature Description

Immature similar to adult female. Immature female with indistinct streaking on back and without black in throat.

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Similar Species

  • Adult male distinctive. Female and immatures resemble other closely related species.
  • Black-throated Green Warbler has a more green and unmarked back, less well-defined cheek patch, and some yellow at the vent under the tail.
  • Golden-cheeked Warbler has yellow face with distinct dark line through eye, not a large patch, and less yellow on chest.
  • Hermit Warbler has yellow eyering and an indistinct face patch, yellow forehead, and lacks yellow on chest and stripes down sides.

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