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Costa's Hummingbird

Calypte costae ORDER: APODIFORMES FAMILY: TROCHILIDAE

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

A desert hummingbird, Costa's Hummingbird breeds in the Sonoran and Mojave Deserts of California and Arizona. It departs the desert in the hottest days of summer, moving to chaparral, scrub, or woodland habitat.

At a GlanceHelp

Measurements
Both Sexes
Length
3.5 in
9 cm
Wingspan
4.3 in
11 cm
Weight
0.1–0.1 oz
2–3 g
Other Names
  • Colibri de Costa (French)
  • Colibrí de Costa (Spanish)

Cool Facts

  • Researchers have found that Costa's Hummingbird can enter a torpid state, with slowed heart rates and reduced body temperatures, under low ambient nighttime temperatures. The hearts of torpid Costa's Hummingbirds beat about 50 times per minute, while those of nontorpid resting Costa's Hummingbirds beat 500 to 900 times per minute.
  • The oldest recorded Costa's Hummingbird was a female, and at least 8 years, 9 months old when she was recaptured and rereleased during banding operations in California in 2009, the same state where she had been banded in 2001.

Habitat


Deserts

Desert and semi-desert, arid brushy foothills and chaparral, in migration and winter also in adjacent mountains and in open meadows and gardens.

Food


Nectar

Nesting

Nesting Facts
Clutch Size
2–3 eggs
Condition at Hatching
Helpless.
Nest Placement

Shrub

Behavior


Hovering

Conservation

status via IUCN

Least Concern

Costa's Hummingbird populations appear to have experienced a slow decline between 1966 and 2015, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey. Partner's in Flight estimates a global breeding population of 3 million, with 48% spending some part of the year in the U.S., and 71% in Mexico. The species rates a 13 out of 20 on the Continental Concern Score. Costa's Hummingbird is not on the 2016 State of North America's Birds' Watch List. Loss of habitat, especially coastal scrub and Sonoran desert scrub, pose the most serious threat to this species. The availability of feeders may have a compensating effect.

Credits

Range Map Help

Costa
View dynamic map of eBird sightings

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