BNA Says Thanks to Birdsharers

December 9, 2008
Cedar Waxwing with an orange-tipped tail instead of the usual yellow tips.Byard Miller‘s Cedar Waxwing, one of his 19 photos at BNA. It’s a beautiful image and scientifically interesting, too. Most Cedar Waxwings have yellow-tipped tail feathers; this one’s are orange – perhaps related to the bird’s diet.

It’s been a while since we checked in with our flickr group, Birdshare, to see what’s new. But the Lab folks who run Birds of North America Online (located just upstairs from Round Robin Central) have been putting your contributions to good use – and now they want to say thanks.

New self-paced course: Learn How to Identify Bird Songs, Click to Learn More

The Birds of North America series is a monumental effort to gather all available scientific information about every bird species in North America (north of Mexico) and Hawaii. The initial effort took 10 years and the volunteer work of hundreds of scientists to complete, and you can now find the multivolume set in libraries around the world.

But the thing about science is it’s always moving forward. Recognizing this, the Birds of North America editors moved the whole operation online in 2003, making the accounts available for a modest subscription and using the proceeds to continue revising, updating, and serving the accounts. The Birdshare photo pool is proving to be a huge help with the difficult task of finding images to document behavior and plumages.

Since Birdshare went live in July, BNA managing editor Stacy Oborn has combed through your contributions. So far, she’s used 164 photos of 121 species to update BNA species accounts. Those photos have come from 48 Birdshare members. As Stacy puts it, “Thanks to everyone for providing the Lab with this really rich resource!”

To show her thanks, she’d like to award a free, one-year subscription to BNA to the four contributors so far who have 10 or more photos in use. Those four top contributors are Byard Miller with 19 photos, Debbie McKenzie with 14, Michael Hogan with 12, and Robin Bird with 11.

We’d also like to say thank-you to the other 44 Birdsharers whose photos are in use at BNA, by giving you a free one-month subscription so you can check out your photo and look around at the rest of the resource. As we go forward, Stacy will keep offering subscriptions to contributors whose photos wind up in BNA, so please keep on Birdsharing!

We hope you’ll enjoy the Birds of North America accounts – they’re kind of like a turbocharged version of All About Birds, and are widely regarded as the world’s definitive source of scientific information about these more than 700 bird species.

By contributing, you’re joining ranks with the hundreds of scientists who volunteered to write these accounts, and you’re continuing the Lab’s long tradition of finding ways for the general public to advance the causes of science and conservation. With each shutter click, you’re helping us learn a little more about the natural world. Thank you.

Birdshare members in BNA: Next week, we’ll start contacting you through your flickr account to set up your free subscriptions – so check your flickr mail!

(19 photos)

Byard Miller

(14 photos)

Debbie McKenzie

(12 photos)

Michael Hogan

(11 photos)

Robin Bird

(9 photos)

cdbtx

Sam Wilson

(7 photos)

warblered

quasimodo4502

(5 photos)

The Veteran Naturalist

Dennis Curry

(4 photos)

Mike Conn

David Cree

Darin Ziegler

(3 photos)

Quietriver250

PortlandBirds

Monteverde2000

Jon Rowley

Jim Paris

birdmandea

(2 photos)

desertvu

Donald Metzner

Jamie Chavez

PIWO

vidular

(1 photo)

#1 Auntie

adf6879

barnmom42

Bill Corwin

Bob Devlin

Bob Scott

C. Tucker

Fred Dietrich

Greg Bishop

Gretel DeRuiter

Jeff Smith

Jennifer Taggert

kdilello-smith

Marcus Smith

Mark MacMillan

Mike Blom

Nieke’s nature

Robin Jay

slr2006

soderlis

Stylurus

Suzanne Broussard

tehag

Zac Peterson

P.S. Stay tuned for more Birdshare news on this blog coming soon. We’ve got a list of 50 species we could use help with.

Comments

  • Cool picture.

  • I love the Cornell Lab web site and refer to it often. I’m definitely a bird enthusiast and happily feed the birds in my yard almost all year round. My most recent visit was to look up the Yellow Throated Warbler as I’ve had one at my feeders for nearly a week. I live in the north est coast of Nova Scotia and from what I can gather he shouldn’t be here. I’ve made sure that he has lots f suet and peanut butter and I hope he’ll make oit OK. I love his cheery call.

  • Yellow-throated Warbler is a very rare bird in Nova Scotia, but one turns up every year or two in Nov-Dec.Could you post your sighting to http://www.ebird.org ? You will need to sign in and plot your location. If you could get a photo (use a point-and-shoot through binoculars if you need to) that would be great! Feel free to email me (mji26@cornell.edu). Thanks!

  • Lorcan Keating

    Thank you for publishing my 7 photos. I do not know all of the photo’s you picked from my lot but was able to view at least four. I must comb through the listings and see if I can find the rest.

  • Hugh

    Hi Lorcan – thanks for your contributions. I don’t know for sure what your flickr username is, but if you’re who I think you are, then the photos of yours we used were Anna’s Hummingbird (2), Western Scrub-Jay (3), Pygmy Nuthatch, and Steller’s Jay. Thanks!

  • Lorcan Keating

    Thank you so much. After I left my comment I found the rest of my pics.